Category Archives: Uncategorized

More Old Photos

I’ve been liking my growing collection of old photographs. They take up less space than clothing, haha.

Here’s half of my finds from yesterday – I went to flea markets and antique stores and came back with a nice collection! Only one was dated or inscribed, so the rest are kind of speculation.

DSCN9782  DSCN9786

Here’s the oldest of the bunch – while I have a lot of photos that might be from the 1870s, she’s definitely that old. Her hair is awesome, her dress is pretty cool – and look at her smile. I feel like she’s genuinely happy.

DSCN9789

I like the spontaneity of this pose. I’m thinking this is between 1910-1914.

DSCN9794

Another 1900ish picture. This photo is so striking. She looks proud and confident and she’s such a beautiful Gibson Girl model. She’s also not super skinny, which is always nice to see because it helps dispel the people-were-smaller-back-then myth. I’m a little confused with the front waistline of her dress. it looks like a raw edge tucked into a waistband, and coming loose. The cloth looks pilled and ravely too.

DSCN9798

This is my only inscribed/dated photo from this batch: “To Anna with love, 1918”. This woman is now known to me as Lady Spock. But check out her hair.

DSCN9803

Lady Spock’s putzy matted hair. When you really want that new short look, but you just can’t bring yourself to cut anything … here are 1,309 hair pins.

DSCN9805

I think this is a really interesting photo. I’m half wondering if this is the woman from two pictures up. She’s beautiful and very Gibson-Girl-esque. I bought this photo because of her kind of risqué-looking dress – or is it a dress? It looks a lot like lingerie – and this on her shoulder …

DSCN9810

It’s a jeweled gecko. I’m assuming it’s a pin, like a brooch, but there’s not clothing for it to attach to here. She just balanced it there.

Advertisements

The Ladies’ World, September 1907: A Selection

DSCN9390

I like the seaside color scheme of navy, white and coral.

DSCN9394

I love her outfit; so jaunty.

DSCN9395

All this frufru and fluffiness and corsetry exists UNDER a dress …

DSCN9397

Reusing old clothing by dyeing it. I’m wondering if the neon blaze-orange ink is a subliminal plug for the dye too.

DSCN9398

Tie dyeing in 1907! 

DSCN9399

DSCN9401

Fashions for November 1907. Click on the image for a larger picture with more detail. And check it out in the upper right corner … it’s the G-D waist again!

DSCN9406

DSCN9407

How to properly fit a skirt.


Plus Feathers!

I wanted my next post to be patterns, but I’m so excited about my new 1910s – early 20s hat, I had to share it. I added feathers, because frufru is awesome. I found the feathers already attached together in some sort of flower arrangement feather-duster-like pouf at a craft store – the closest I’m going to come to one of those awful Victorian let’s-just-stick-half-a-dead-bird-here decorations.

DSCN0093

The feathers are brown, dark with peacock iridescence, and there are a few very skinny tan ones at the back. I love how they look against the navy velvet.

copy1

This hat is my entry for the Historic Sew Fortnightly’s Challenge #2, Blue.

The original I based mine on, from LACMA.

The original I based mine on, from LACMA.

See my original blog post about sewing this hat here.


So Yeah … Writing …

I’ve been away.

(“Thank you, Captain Obvious.” “You’re welcome, Lieutenant Sarcasm.”)

Away, right now, means moving and finals week, with a side of holidays thrown in. The upshot is that I probably won’t be writing again until after Christmas or so.

In the meantime, I’m SUPER EXCITED to hear that the Historic Sew Fortnightly is continuing into 2015 with a monthly schedule, so I’m waking up the grey matter to figure out a project for the first challenge. More to come.

I finished by dad’s black and white waistcoat, but still have to write about how that did or didn’t work out. More to come.

I’ve received a lot of Victorian/Edwardian clothing that I can’t wait to take my camera to and show off here, and get some input on what’s what. It includes purses, a hat, underclothing, dresses, skirts and shirtwaists, all dating from about 1840-60 (still figuring out that date) up to maybe 1910. I very, very much want to reproduce some of it for my own wardrobe. More to come.

So yeah. Happy Holidays, everybody, and I’ll be back soon! 😀


Reticule, Part 2

Over the past few days the reticule has become fancier, and I think it can get even more fancy: I still have areas that are asking to be filled with designs. I haven’t lined it yet because I keep going back and adding stuff.

IMG_2203

Now with 78% more leaves! It’s like a folk-art weeping willow, but also like a vase full of seaweed. I added linen tassels to the drawstring ends too.

IMG_2206

I think the biggest problem is that the big chunky designs are on the flat areas, and the detailed embroidery is lost in the folds at the top. I think I can compensate by putting something detailed inside those circles.

IMG_2200

Next to an original turn-of-the-century linen purse. An illustration of how popular this simple style was. 


Saint Savina’s Cote

I want to make an easy-to-wear, late Medieval/early Renaissance dress to wear to Renaissance fairs, and since I’m at The Met a few times a month, I decided to go check out their Medieval & Renaissance art.

So here’s a depiction of Saint Savina, 1510-1520, France. It seems that artists of that time didn’t worry too much about the saints & Holy Family wearing historically accurate clothing, but would put them in medieval fashions, adding picturesque drapery. These medieval artists created a sartorial look for Christian icons, and it has become so accepted that nowadays, most nativity scenes have the Holy Family wearing some form of medieval clothing plus drapery.

The label for this statue reads that in Troyes, Saint Savina was depicted as a ‘youthful pilgrim’, with a characteristic staff, hat and bag. Maybe her appearance was based off of other pilgrims, or a stereotypical image of a pilgrim at the time. She’s also a saint, so she holds a gospel and a palm frond that symbolizes her martyrdom.

The long drapery is probably artistic license, but I think the bodice of the gown underneath is fairly contemporary. I’m assuming it’s a variation on the cote or cotte (sometimes called a cotehardie), a tightly-fitted gown worn underneath the looser robe, and over a chemise. It’s tightly fitted at the torso and has fairly narrow sleeves. The skirt is long with a decorated hem.

There’s some paint left on this statue, mostly red and a great blue-teal kind of color, which the cote was painted with.

1aaa

This cote has

1) a square, decorated neckline bound with a separate pice of cloth

2) no waist seam; the skirt flares from bodice pieces

3) either it’s lined with the lining turned over the outer edge, or the edges are bound

4) and the bodice is closed with about seven pins!

1aaaaaa

That hat …

1aaaa

A pretty utilitarian-looking shoe surrounded by reasonably impractical drapery.

1aaaaa

That great bag.

Now about those pins. The entire outfit seems, to me, to be a mix of practical clothing suitable for walking (a simple gown, plain shoes, a staff and a bag) and possibly exaggerated, possibly classically-inspired drapery. Which category do the pins fall into? I’m assuming they’re listed under the more practical heading.

I’m reminded of a good reenacting saying, though – be the common person, not the exception to the rule. If I have to go out of my way to try to explain this cote’s different front, is it really what most women wore, or is it an exception to the rule? I think lacing is probably the way to go for my own cote.


Wandering the Metropolitan Museum

When the guard says photos are okay, I’m in heaven.

4

The Triumph of Fame from The Triumphs, Brussels, 1502-1504, wool and silk. The plaque says that this tapestry, or one very similar to it, was purchased by Isabella, queen of Castile and Aragon in 1504. It shows Fame conquering Death and the Fates with Christian imagery and long wavy hair.

Check these details out.

1

Don’t they look like sunglasses?

3

Proving that men have been doing that super unfortunate sandals-over-socks thing for a long time now.

2

Supposedly these women are the Fates, all getting trampled by goodliness and virtue. The one in the front is wearing a dress that I LOVE – but the thing that’s really getting to me is her hair.

2 copy

I think I remember wearing this when I was 5.